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Trump Immediately HALTS His Speech As Soon As He Spotted Who Was Hiding In The Crowd

 

Mrs. Moser went on to explain that her son just made a bad choice one night and he got himself hooked on drugs. Which later landed him in the streets where he was introduced to the death sentence which is fentanyl, a drug that’s fast becoming one of the deadliest known to man, 50 to 100 times stronger than morphine.

Moser relayed to the crowd:

‘Adam was our oldest son. He was a great kid. He was a smart kid. He was the kind of kid that made you feel really good about yourself. You give him five minutes; you really liked him. He just made a bad choice one night. As smart as he was, he found his way into our kitchen cabinet. And, sadly, the rest is history. He got hooked on it.

He’s been gone for two-and-a-half years, and we miss him every day.’

 Watch the moment President Trump invited Jim & Jeanne up to speak.

Jeanne Moser of East Kingston, who lost her son Adam to a drug overdose, is greeted by President Donald Trump at Manchester Community College (DAVID LANE/UNION LEADER)

In his 40 minute speech, the president went on to detail some of his $13 billion dollar plan which will, unlike the plans that came before, focus on treatment while at the same time reducing demand by eliminating the gateways which lead to a person becoming addicted to these dangerous substances. Trump’s plan also imposes the death penalty for some of the highest level drug pushers in the nation.

The president made it very clear, we will protect our children from these drugs, which he affirms will make our nation “better, brighter, stronger and greater than ever before. Because as long as we have trust in our citizens, pride in our country and faith in our God, we will not fail.” “failure is not an option and addiction is not in our future” he added.

‘Calling the opioid epidemic a scourge, but vowing that it will be defeated, President Donald Trump returned to New Hampshire Monday to unveil a broad plan to combat the crisis.

While the $13 billion plan is multipronged and focuses on treatment and reducing demand by eliminating over-prescription, the president in a 30-minute speech at Manchester Community College strongly reiterated his call for the death penalty to be imposed on some traffickers.

Trump was accompanied to Manchester by first lady Melania Trump, Attorney General Jeff Session, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, Surgeon General Jerome Adams and drug czar Jim Carroll.

The president praised first responders, saying that they exemplify “the American heart who fight every day to help rescue their fellow citizens from the grips of addiction.”

“They remind us that for America, there is nothing beyond our reach. Nothing at all,” Trump said.

“We will protect our beautiful children and we will ensure that tomorrow is better, brighter, stronger and greater than ever before. Because as long as we have trust in our citizens, pride in our country and faith in our God, we will not fail.’

Many will say this has been tried before under the Nancy Reagan’s, “Just Say No” campaign during the 80’s and it didn’t work. But this isn’t the same plan and to say the “Just Say No” campaign of the 80’s didn’t work isn’t 100% true, for many of us 80’s kids thought it was cool to “Just say no,” and we did.

1987 “Just say no” commercial

And the updated version from 1997

“What is fentanyl?

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent. It is a schedule II prescription drug,3 and it is typically used to treat patients with severe pain or to manage pain after surgery.4 It is also sometimes used to treat patients with chronic pain who are physically tolerant to other opioids.5 In its prescription form, fentanyl is known by such names as Actiq®, Duragesic®, and Sublimaze®.5,6 Street names for fentanyl or for fentanyl-laced heroin include Apache, China Girl, China White, Dance Fever, Friend, Goodfella, Jackpot, Murder 8, TNT, and Tango and Cash.

How do people use fentanyl?
When prescribed by a physician, fentanyl is often administered via injection, transdermal patch, or in lozenges.6 However, the fentanyl and fentanyl analogs associated with recent overdoses are produced in clandestine laboratories.7 This non-pharmaceutical fentanyl is sold in the following forms: as a powder; spiked on blotter paper; mixed with or substituted for heroin; or as tablets that mimic other, less potent opioids.8 People can swallow, snort, or inject fentanyl, or they can put blotter paper in their mouths so that fentanyl is absorbed through the mucous membrane.

How does fentanyl affect the brain?
Like heroin, morphine, and other opioid drugs, fentanyl works by binding to the body’s opioid receptors, which are found in areas of the brain that control pain and emotions.9 When opioid drugs bind to these receptors, they can drive up dopamine levels in the brain’s reward areas, producing a state of euphoria and relaxation.9 Fentanyl’s effects resemble those of heroin and include euphoria, drowsiness, nausea, confusion, constipation, sedation, tolerance, addiction, respiratory depression and arrest, unconsciousness, coma, and death.

Points to Remember
Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid analgesic that is similar to morphine but is 50 to 100 times more potent.

Non-pharmaceutical fentanyl is sold in the following forms: as a powder; spiked on blotter paper; mixed with or substituted for heroin; or as tablets that mimic other, less potent opioids.
Fentanyl works by binding to the body’s opioid receptors, which are found in areas of the brain that control pain and emotions. Its effects include euphoria, drowsiness, nausea, confusion, constipation, sedation, tolerance, addiction, respiratory depression and arrest, unconsciousness, coma, and death.
The high potency of fentanyl greatly increases risk of overdose, especially if a person who uses drugs is unaware that a powder or pill contains fentanyl

Why is fentanyl dangerous?
Opioid receptors are also found in the areas of the brain that control breathing rate. High doses of opioids, especially potent opioids such as fentanyl, can cause breathing to stop completely, which can lead to death.9 The high potency of fentanyl greatly increases risk of overdose, especially if a person who uses drugs is unaware that a powder or pill contains fentanyl.6,10 Fentanyl sold on the street can be mixed with heroin or cocaine, which markedly amplifies its potency and potential dangers.11

The medication naloxone is an opioid receptor antagonist that reverses opioid overdose and restores normal respiration. Overdoses of fentanyl should be treated immediately with naloxone and may require higher doses to successfully reverse the overdose.”

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